calender icon
23.-24.05.2016
arrow down icon

Berlin Conference - 2016 Berlin Conference On Global Environmental Change: Transformative Global Climate Governance “Aprùs Paris” Berlin

twitter bird icon
#Klimalog
28.06.2016 16:59
arrow down icon
Proud of my institute,@DIE_GDI jumps from #34 to #13 in Top Climate Think Tank ranking of 2014. https://t.co/WbAv8OXov7 #Klimalog
DE
EN

Klimalog

Forschung und Dialog fĂŒr eine klimagerechte Transformation

Hier geht es zum Video

calender icon
23.-24.05.2016
arrow down icon

Berlin Conference - 2016 Berlin Conference On Global Environmental Change: Transformative Global Climate Governance “Aprùs Paris”

twitter bird icon
@DIE_GDI
arrow down icon

Was ist Klimalog?

"Der Klimawandel bedroht die globale menschliche Entwicklung und internationale StabilitÀt"
Dirk Messner, Direktor des Deutschen Instituts fĂŒr Entwicklungspolitik (DIE)

Forschung und Dialog fĂŒr eine
klimagerechte Transformation

Eine ehrgeizige internationale Klimapolitik ist entscheidend fĂŒr eine nachhaltige Entwicklung. Die Begrenzung des Klimawandels erfordert einen schnellen und radikalen Wandel in Politik, Wirtschaft und Gesellschaft – auf globaler, nationaler und lokaler Ebene. Diese Transformation muss klimasmart und gerecht gestaltet werden.

Das Deutsche Institut fĂŒr Entwicklungspolitik (DIE) untersucht im Rahmen des Projekts Klimalog Brennpunktthemen der internationalen Klimapolitik und organisiert Dialogveranstaltungen zwischen Politik, Wissenschaft, Wirtschaft und Zivilgesellschaft.

Oh, unfortunately your device doesn’t support the INDC Content Explorer.
For the full experience please use your desktop computer.

Beyond mitigation: INDC content explorer

Beyond mitigation: INDC content explorer

The INDC Content Explorer allows you to search through countries' national climate plans (INDCs). Scroll through countries' INDC content by clicking on “Choose a Category” or click on a country to view a summary of their action plans. You can view more information on the INDC Content Explorer in the ‘About’ window.

Launch Content Explorer

    Beyond Mitigation: INDC content explorer

    What are the Intended Nationally Determined Contributions (INDCs)?
    In December 2011 in Durban, the parties to the Under the United Nations Framework Convention on Climate Change (UNFCCC) committed to create a new international climate agreement by 2015, which would enter into force in 2020. In 2013, the parties decided that every country would submit an 'Intended Nationally Determined Contribution' (INDC) in order to help facilitate this goal. Accordingly, almost every country in the world formulated an INDC and submitted it to the UNFCCC secretariat before the UN Climate Summit in Paris in 2015 (COP21). Countries based their INDCs on their specific national priorities, circumstances, and capabilities.

    First and foremost INDCs are meant to increase the global ambition to reduce greenhouse gas emissions, by outlining countries ‘contributions’. However, most countries also use the opportunity to write about other priorities and ambitions, such as adaptation and finance needs. Countries also used their INDC to signal other important issues, such as reviewing of INDCs and fossil fuel subsidy reform. This INDC Content Explorer helps to get a better understanding of such content beyond mitigation targets.

    How does the INDC Content Explorer work?
    The INDC Content Explorer allows you to search through countries' national climate plans under the UNFCCC. Scroll through countries’ INDC content by clicking on “Choose a Category”. By clicking on a country, you can see this country’s summary for all categories. You can also compare countries, or zoom in on the world map.

    Explanation of the Categories

    1. Fossil Fuel Subsidy Reform: Indicates the countries commitment in INDCs to change or phase out state subsidies of fossil fuels.

    2. Costs of mitigation in order to make the contribution: Until the Paris Agreement, 60 countries included an indication of the (partial) costs of reaching the mitigation contribution as described in their INDC.

    3. Costs of adaptation in order to make the contribution: Until the Paris Agreement, 53 countries included an indication of the (partial) costs of reaching the adaptation contribution as described in their INDC.

    4. Mitigation finance: In the 2009 Copenhagen Accord, developed countries pledged to mobilize USD 100 billion annually by 2020 to support developing countries with mitigation and adaptation. This category analyses whether INDCs mention mitigation finance, and whether countries make such international finance conditional for their contribution to mitigation.

    5. Adaptation finance: In the 2009 Copenhagen Accord, developed countries pledged to mobilize USD 100 billion annually by 2020 to support developing countries with mitigation and adaptation. This category analyses whether INDCs mention adaptation finance, and whether countries make such international finance conditional for their contribution to adaptation.

    6. Historical responsibility: Historical responsibility means that countries with high emissions in the past (historical emissions) have a larger responsibility to address climate change than countries with low historical emissions.

    7. Section on Fairness: Countries were asked to include information on how their INDC is fair and ambitious. This category shows whether countries have dedicated a section to ‘fairness’ or ‘equity’ and whether they contextualize their emissions here.

    8. Adaptation: This category shows the extent to which countries include adaptation in their INDC. ‘Actions’ are short term and concrete adaptation measures; ‘strategies’ concern longer-term adaptation planning and general adaptation goals.

    9. Loss and Damage (L&D): L&D denotes climate change impacts that occur despite mitigation and adaptation efforts. This category shows whether L&D is mentioned in INDCs, and whether this is done in the context of finance needs.

    10. Assessment and Review: Assessment and review (A&R) can help ensure that INDC contributions are in line with internationally agreed objectives and principles, and can help to ensure fairness and ambition (van Asselt et al., 2015). This category shows whether countries refer to assessment or review of INDCs, and whether they aim to track the implementation of their INDC.

    11. Length of INDC: This category shows the length of the INDCs in pages, as a proxy for how extensive they are.

    Explanation of the bar graphs
    The bar graphs in the upper left corner show how three distinct groups of countries have included information on the categories in their INDCs in percentages. These groups can be considered a step beyond the classical bifurcation of developed and developing countries (see Pauw et al., 2014), and are as follows:

    'Annex I' – Developed countries who are party to the 'Annex I' of the 1992 Framework Convention of the UNFCCC. These are overwhelmingly western countries with high historical emissions.

    ‘LDCs and SIDS’ – This group consists of Least Developed Countries (LDCs) and the Small Island Development States (SIDS). These countries are grouped together in the 2015 Paris Agreement of the UNFCCC, for example as being ‘particularly vulnerable’ to climate change.

    'Middle Countries' – These countries are neither Annex I countries, nor LDCs or SIDS. This diverse group includes, among others, emerging economies such as China, India and South Africa, as well as most countries on the Arabian peninsula.

    The graphs are based on all 159 INDCs that were submitted before 12.12.15 (the day parties agreed on the Paris Agreement).

    Database development
    The INDC Content Explorer is based on a database developed by Pieter Pauw (DIE), Kennedy Mbeva (ACTS, Nairobi) and a team of analysts at the German Development Institute / Deutsches Institut fĂŒr Entwicklungspolitik (DIE). In a context of very limited UNFCCC guidelines for INDCs, the database and the INDC Content Explorer aim to clarify countries’ ambitions and priorities beyond mitigation. If you come across any inconsistencies, please contact Pieter Pauw.

    Reference / License:The German Development Institute / Deutsches Institut fĂŒr Entwicklungspolitik (DIE) holds the copyright to the INDC Content Explorer and the database that it is based on. It is licensed under Creative Commons and you are free to copy and redistribute material derived from the INDC Content Explorer by following the guideline of the Creative Commons License
    CC BY-NC-ND 4.0 (full attribution, non commercial use, no derivatives).

    In research output and presentations, please refer to this database as 'Pauw, W.P. Barthe, F., Friedrich, M., Hadir, S. and Mbeva, K. (2016). Beyond mitigation: INDC content explorer. German Development Institute / Deutsches Institut fĂŒr Entwicklungspolitik (DIE), Bonn.
    Martin Koch and Marie Fuchs (DIE) supported the visual design and the development of the 11 categories.

    Demodern GmbH developed the online visualisation.

    The INDC Content Explorer is part of the Klimalog project, financed by the German Federal Ministry for Economic Cooperation and Development (BMZ).

    Choose another country
    Fossil Fuel Subsidy Reform
    Costs of mitigation
    Costs of adaptation
    Mitigation finance
    Adaptation finance
    Historical responsibility
    Section on fairness
    Adaptation
    Loss and Damage
    Assessment and Review
    Size of INDC

    Compare with another country

    Fossil Fuel Subsidy Reform
    Costs of mitigation
    Costs of adaptation
    Mitigation finance
    Adaptation finance
    Historical responsibility
    Section on fairness
    Adaptation
    Loss and Damage
    Assessment and Review
    Size of INDC

    Schwerpunkte

    show all events
    show all events

    Damit die notwendige Dekarbonisierung der Weltwirtschaft gelingen kann, mĂŒssen die globalen Regeln fĂŒr die Wirtschaft (Global Economic Governance) und fĂŒr den Schutz des Klimas (Global Climate Governance) gut zusammenspielen. Wie sollte diese Interaktion gestaltet sein? Wie fördern oder behindern internationale Handels- und Investitionsabkommen Maßnahmen fĂŒr Emissionsreduzierung? Was sind die dringendsten klimarelevanten Reformen der Global Economic Governance?

    Zeige Infografiken

    show all events

    Globale
    Rahmen-bedingungen

    Forscherinnen und Forscher

    arrow icon

    Viele LĂ€nder haben bereits Strategien entwickelt, um den Ausstoß von Treibhausgasemissionen zu reduzieren und ihre Wirtschaft zu dekarbonisieren. Diese vernachlĂ€ssigen aber in der Regel politökonomische Dynamiken: Bei der VerĂ€nderung wirtschaftlicher Strukturen sind Interessen, Macht und Einfluss oft ausschlaggebender als technische Effizienz. Dieser Forschungsschwerpunkt untersucht die politökonomischen Voraussetzungen ausgewĂ€hlter PartnerlĂ€nder Deutschlands und wie diese im Rahmen der internationalen Zusammenarbeit berücksichtigt werden können.

    Zeige Infografiken

    show all events

    Nationale politische Ökonomie -
    RealitÀten der Dekarbonisierung

    Forscherinnen und Forscher

    Infografik

    arrow icon

    Der Klimawandel ist RealitĂ€t, viele Menschen leiden schon heute unter seinen Folgen. Es gilt daher, die Folgewirkungen des Klimawandels abzumildern und den Umgang mit nicht mehr zu verhindernden Folgen zu ermöglichen. Entsprechende Investitionen können aber auch zu Zielkonflikten fĂŒhren, z.B. in der ArmutsbekĂ€mpfung oder beim Artenschutz. Welche Erfahrungen gibt es hinsichtlich der positiven wie negativen Auswirkungen von Klimaschutzmaßnahmen? Welche GestaltungsansĂ€tze gibt es, um entsprechende Zielkonflikte zu antizipieren und zu vermeiden?

    Zeige Infografiken

    show all events

    Zielkonflikte zwischen
    Klimaschutz und Anpassung

    Forscherinnen und Forscher

    Infografik

    arrow icon

    Ob Reformen des globalen ordnungspolitischen Rahmens die Dekarbonisierung der Weltwirtschaft und die Klimaresilienz von Gesellschaften unterstĂŒtzen, zeigt sich auf nationaler, regionaler und lokaler Ebene. Welche Wechselwirkungen gibt es zwischen globalen Institutionen und nationalen Transformationsprozessen? Wie wirken sich insbesondere Klimafinanzierung und die internationale Klimafinanzarchitektur auf nationale Transformationsprozesse aus?

    Zeige Infografiken

    show all events

    Mehrebenen -
    Herausforderung

    Forscherinnen und Forscher

    arrow icon

    Unsere Forscherinnen und Forscher

    Steffen Bauer
    Steffen Bauer
    Umweltpolitik und Ressourcenmanagement
    Wissenschaftlicher Mitarbeiter
    Politikwissenschaftler
    http://www.die-gdi.de/steffen-bauer/

    „Wirksame Klimapolitik braucht vertrauensbildende Maßnahmen zwischen Nord und SĂŒd.“

    Clara Brandi
    Clara Brandi
    Weltwirtschaft und Entwicklungsfinanzierung
    Wissenschaftliche Mitarbeiterin
    Ökonomin und Politikwissenschaftlerin
    Internationaler Handel, Global Governance, Schwerpunkt internationale Handelspolitik und Klimapolitik, Sustainable Development, 2030 Agenda, Green Economy, Internationale normative Theorie, globale Gerechtigkeit
    http://www.die-gdi.de/clara-brandi/

    „Wir sind die letzte Generation, die etwas gegen den Klimawandel tun kann.“

    Axel Berger
    Axel Berger
    Weltwirtschaft und Entwicklungsfinanzierung
    Wissenschaftlicher Mitarbeiter
    Politikwissenschaftler
    Foreign Direct Investment, International Investment Agreements, Global Economic Governance, International Economic Law
    http://www.die-gdi.de/axel-berger/

    „Effektiver Klimaschutz setzt die Transformation weltwirtschaftlicher Rahmenbedingungen voraus.“

    Dominique Bruhn
    Dominique Bruhn
    Weltwirtschaft und Entwicklungsfinanzierung
    Wissenschaftliche Mitarbeiterin
    Ökonomin
    Internationaler Handel & Investitionen
    http://www.die-gdi.de/research-staff/bruhn-dominique/

    „FĂŒr die Dekarbonisierung der Weltwirtschaft brauchen wir grĂŒne Handels- und Investitionsregeln.“

    Sander Chan
    Sander Chan
    Umweltpolitik und Ressourcenmanagement
    Wissenschaftlicher Mitarbeiter
    Umweltpolitik
    Klimapolitik, nachhaltige Entwicklungspolitik, nichtstaatliche Akteure, öffentlich-private Partnerschaften
    http://www.die-gdi.de/sander-chan/

    „Die gute Nachricht: Viele StĂ€dte, Unternehmen und NGOs sind im Klimaschutz aktiver denn je.“

    Eva Dick
    Eva Dick
    Umweltpolitik und Ressourcenmanagement
    Wissenschaftliche Mitarbeiterin
    Soziologin und Raumplanerin
    Stadtentwicklung und stÀdtische/regionale Governance, informelle Siedlungsentwicklung, Migration und Integration, Stadt-Land Verbindungen
    http://www.die-gdi.de/eva-dick/

    „Ich untersuche Einfluss und Zusammenwirken stĂ€dtischer Akteure auf den Klimawandel.“

    Marie Fuchs
    Marie Fuchs
    Stabsstelle Kommunikation
    Referentin Klimalog
    http://www.die-gdi.de/marie-fuchs/

    „Klimaschutz verdient die grĂ¶ĂŸtmögliche öffentliche Aufmerksamkeit. DafĂŒr setze ich mich ein.“

    Maria-Theres Haase
    Maria-Theres Haase
    Umweltpolitik und Ressourcenmanagement
    Stadtplanung
    (soziale) Stadtentwicklung, Transport, local governance - Partizipation
    http://www.die-gdi.de/maria-theres-haase/

    „StĂ€dte sind Labore der Klimapolitik.“

    Jonas Hein
    Jonas Hein
    Umweltpolitik und Ressourcenmanagement
    Wissenschaftlicher Mitarbeiter
    Geograph
    Wald- und Klimapolitik, REDD (Reducing Emissions from Deforestation and Degradation), UmweltverĂ€nderungen und Migration, Politische Ökologie
    http://www.die-gdi.de/jonas-hein/

    „Bei der Klimapolitik mĂŒssen wir Gerechtigkeit und vulnerable Gruppen im Blick haben.“

    Britta Horstmann
    Britta Horstmann
    Umweltpolitik und Ressourcenmanagement
    Wissenschaftliche Mitarbeiterin
    Geographin
    Klimapolitik und -finanzierung, Anpassung an den Klimawandel, aid effectiveness
    http://www.die-gdi.de/britta-horstmann/

    „Klimafinanzierung muss die BedĂŒrfnisse der Vulnerablen unterstĂŒtzen.“

    Maxim Injakin
    Maxim Injakin
    Umweltpolitik und Ressourcenmanagement
    Projektkoordination
    http://www.die-gdi.de/maxim-injakin/

    „Nur mit verbindlichen Vereinbarungen, die fĂŒr alle gelten, können wir unsere gemeinsamen Ziele erreichen.“

    Jonas Keil
    Jonas Keil
    Weltwirtschaft und Entwicklungsfinanzierung
    Wissenschaftlicher Mitarbeiter
    Ökonom
    Entwicklungsfinanzierung, Green Finance
    http://www.die-gdi.de/jonas-keil/

    „Eine nachhaltige Klimapolitik muss ökologisch effektiv, aber auch ökonomisch sinnvoll sein.“

    Okka Lou Mathis
    Okka Lou Mathis
    Umweltpolitik und Ressourcenmanagement
    Wissenschaftliche Mitarbeiterin
    Politikwissenschaftlerin
    http://www.die-gdi.de/okka-lou-mathis/

    „Angesichts des Klimawandels werden alle LĂ€nder zu EntwicklungslĂ€ndern.“

    Pieter Pauw
    Pieter Pauw
    Umweltpolitik und Ressourcenmanagement
    Wissenschaftlicher Mitarbeiter
    Umweltwissenschaftler
    Klima-Anpassung, Klima-Finanzierung, Equity und INDCs
    http://www.die-gdi.de/pieter-pauw/

    „Der Klimawandel ist nicht lĂ€nger ein Problem der zukĂŒnftigen Generation – er ist unser Problem.“

    Anna Pegels
    Anna Pegels
    Nachhaltige Wirtschafts- und Sozialentwicklung
    Wissenschaftliche Mitarbeiterin
    Ökonomin
    Kohlenstoffarme Entwicklung, Erneuerbare Energien, Grüne Industriepolitik, Verhaltensökonomie, Energieeffizienz
    http://www.die-gdi.de/anna-pegels/

    „Klimaschutz ist Interessenspolitik. Der Klimalog erforscht, wie er trotzdem gelingen kann.“

    Peter Wolff
    Peter Wolff
    Weltwirtschaft und Entwicklungsfinanzierung
    Abteilungsleiter
    Ökonom
    Global Economic Governance , Entwicklungsfinanzierung, Entwicklungspolitische Zusammenarbeit mit SchwellenlÀndern
    http://www.die-gdi.de/peter-wolff/

    „Klimafinanzierung ist dann wirkungsvoll, wenn sie mit transformativen Politiken kombiniert wird.“

    Abteilung

    Funktion

    Fachrichtung

    Arbeitsgebiete

    arrow icon

    Bevorstehende Veranstaltungen

    show all events

    Timeline

    show all events
    June
    22
    The Post-Paris Action Agenda
    The objective of the workshop is to engage in a preparatory dialogue on cross-cutting issues of the Action Agenda in order to make the discussions during the Forum as successful as possible.
    Workshop
    Ort/Datum
    Rabat, Marokko
    22.06.2016
    Veranstalter
  • Deutsches Institut fĂŒr Entwicklungspolitik (DIE)
  • Galvanizing the Groundswell of Climate Actions
  • World Wildlife Fund for Nature (WWF)
  • Conference Site
    http://www.die-gdi.de/veranstaltungen/the-post-paris-action-agenda/
    Mehr Infos
    http://www.die-gdi.de/veranstaltungen/the-post-paris-action-agenda/
    December
    6-7
    2016 Nairobi Conference
    The 2016 Conference on Earth System Governance will address the overarching theme of “Confronting Complexity and Inequality”.
    Conference
    Ort/Datum
    Nairobi
    6.-7.12.2016
    Veranstalter
  • Earth System Governance Project / Lund University
  • Deutsches Institut fĂŒr Entwicklungspolitik (DIE)
  • University of Nairobi
  • Conference Site
    http://earthsystemgovernance.net/nairobi2016/
    Mehr Infos
    http://earthsystemgovernance.net/nairobi2016/
    November
    7-18
    COP22 Marrakech
    During the 22nd session of the Conference of the Parties (COP 22) to the UNFCCC, the parties begin preparations for entry into force of the Paris Agreement.
    Konferenz
    Ort/Datum
    Bab Ighli, Marrakesch, Marokko
    07.-18.11.2016
    Veranstalter
  • United Nations Framework Convention on Climate Change (UNFCCC)
  • Conference Site
    http://unfccc.int/meetings/unfccc_calendar/items/2655.php?year=2016
    Mehr Infos
    http://unfccc.int/meetings/unfccc_calendar/items/2655.php?year=2016
    event__two
    December
    6-7
    2016 Nairobi Conference
    Nairobi
    event__three
    November
    7-18
    COP22 Marrakech
    Bab Ighli, Marrakesch, Marokko
    December
    6-7
    2016 Nairobi Conference
    The 2016 Conference on Earth System Governance will address the overarching theme of “Confronting Complexity and Inequality”.
    Conference
    Ort/Datum
    Nairobi
    6.-7.12.2016
    Veranstalter
  • Earth System Governance Project / Lund University
  • Deutsches Institut fĂŒr Entwicklungspolitik (DIE)
  • University of Nairobi
  • Conference Site
    http://earthsystemgovernance.net/nairobi2016/
    Mehr Infos
    http://earthsystemgovernance.net/nairobi2016/
    event__three
    November
    7-18
    COP22 Marrakech
    Bab Ighli, Marrakesch, Marokko
    event__one
    June
    22
    The Post-Paris Action Agenda
    Rabat, Marokko
    November
    7-18
    COP22 Marrakech
    During the 22nd session of the Conference of the Parties (COP 22) to the UNFCCC, the parties begin preparations for entry into force of the Paris Agreement.
    Konferenz
    Ort/Datum
    Bab Ighli, Marrakesch, Marokko
    07.-18.11.2016
    Veranstalter
  • United Nations Framework Convention on Climate Change (UNFCCC)
  • Conference Site
    http://unfccc.int/meetings/unfccc_calendar/items/2655.php?year=2016
    Mehr Infos
    http://unfccc.int/meetings/unfccc_calendar/items/2655.php?year=2016
    event__one
    June
    22
    The Post-Paris Action Agenda
    Rabat, Marokko
    event__two
    December
    6-7
    2016 Nairobi Conference
    Nairobi
    November
    7-18
    COP22 Marrakech
    Bab Ighli, Marrakesch, Marokko
    June
    22
    The Post-Paris Action Agenda
    Rabat, Marokko
    December
    6-7
    2016 Nairobi Conference
    Nairobi

    View All Events

    arrow icon

    „Eine wirksame Klimapolitik erfordert gerechte LösungsansĂ€tze, die zwischen Arm und Reich vermitteln.“

    Imme Scholz, stellv. Direktorin
    des Deutschen Instituts fĂŒr Entwicklungspolitik (DIE)